Thursday, March 31, 2011

Plan Now For Earth Day

In recognition of 2011 as Year of the Turtle, activities zero in on how rising temperatures can affect these reptiles, and also amphibians and birds.

Enjoy a hands-on interactive box turtle exhibit in the Coastal Plain Gallery. A giant replica of an osprey nest in the same gallery provides kids with a bird’s-eye view - and parents with a great photo opportunity.

Live animal programs throughout the week feature turtles and birds. The jeopardy quiz game at select times addresses hot topics with a “Heating Up” theme.

Watch for Discovery stations in Tidal Waters gallery with live animals, hands-on experiments, a life-sized inflatable leatherback sea turtle, reptile egg replicas, activities about marine mammals and other engaging activities that carry a conservation message and prompt discussions about climate change.

On Friday afternoon, April 22, visitors can taste the sweet rewards of a Cakes for Conservation competition. Bakers ages 5 and up express their environmental sentiments with conservation-themed confections and compete for prizes. Entries are served up after the 3:30 p.m. announcement of the winners in two age categories for children, and the professional amateur divisions for grown-ups.

On Saturday, April 23, the Aquarium teams up with other conservation-minded organizations at Fort Macon State Park in Atlantic Beach for the Crystal Coast Earth Day Festival, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. See what’s happening with local conservation efforts and enjoy activities, live music and artwork by local students.


Also on Saturday, imagination meets education in Forest Fairies to Sea Serpents for ages 4-12. Children make fairy and gnome houses on the Aquarium nature trail, hunt for mermaid doors and mythological connections throughout the Aquarium and enjoy a theatrical fairy tale featuring live creatures. A costume contest with plenty of categories and pixie-perfect prizes adds to the magic.

Forest Fairies to Sea Serpents requires advance registration and fees; all other programs are free with admission or membership and no registration is required.

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

New Scales at the Newport Transfer Station

We’re scaling forward at the Newport Transfer Station.  A new set of scales has been installed to replace the scales purchased from Carteret County in 1992.  The “Toughest Truck Scales on Earth” have a capacity of 100 tons.

The old scales are still useful and will be placed on the staging area for transfer trailers to allow employees to weigh authority trailers and not tie up the customer scales.

The scale house will also be replaced.

New scales arriving at the Newport Transfer Station


Tuesday, March 29, 2011

No Cell Phone Use at the Landfill Please

We want to make the Tuscarora Landfill, Grantsboro Transfer Station and Newport Transfer Station as safe as possible.

One way to do this is to ask that cell phones not be used on the scales or our unloading areas.  It is vital that full attention be paid especially around large pieces of equipment.
There are areas at all locations where drivers can pull over and talk if needed.

This policy also includes texting or using other applications on your phone.


Monday, March 28, 2011

Adidas Commits to Sustainable Cotton

From Doyourpart.com

 
Photo Credit: Adidas
 
 
One of the largest sports clothing and footwear makers is overhauling its environmental policies. Adidas announced that part of its new strategy would commit the company to using 100% sustainable cotton by 2018. The company says all cotton used in Adidas clothing will need to meet the Better Cotton Initiative’s standards. Better Cotton is cotton grown in a way that reduces stress on the environment and improves the livelihoods and welfare of farming communities. Better Cotton also uses less water and pesticides. Adidas, along with Ikea, Levi Strauss and other retailers founded the Better Cotton Fast Track Program a few years ago. The companies teamed up to fund farmer education and speed up the switch to Better Cotton Initiative standards. Adidas announced other sustainability goal including seeking more sustainable materials from suppliers, reducing energy and switching to energy sources that produce less carbon. The company will also cut the 800 colors it uses in half and will add more sustainable materials to the toolboxes used by designers. Adidas is also using and testing environmentally friendly alternatives to cotton. The Adidas Supernova Glide 3 running shoe is made with 50 percent recycled polyester and 100 percent recycled polyester laces. It also features renewable foam and a Formation heel technology that reduces waste by 50 percent.

Sunday, March 27, 2011

Cool Springs Education Center

 Thanks Melissa.  This is such a cool place.  I had the privilege of participating in the Coastal Envirothon at Cool Springs last week.

Check out the Cool Springs Education Center:

http://www.weyerhaeuser.com/Sustainability/CoolSprings 

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

The 3 R's....Family Style Conclusion

Thank you Kristen Aubut with RE3.org for documenting this adventure.


http://re3org.blogspot.com/2011/03/conclusion-to-my-alabama-waste-disposal.html

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Compost Presentation at Pine Cone Perrinial

Thank you Wendy Graveman for the invitation and Wendy Card for capturing our compost presentation at Pinecone Perrinial last Saturday.




Saturday, March 19, 2011

New Bern Home and Garden Show

 Stop by our booth for a free yo-yo made of recycled plastic.
 
 
From the Sun Journal

Spring is the time for rejuvenation and inspiration.

The annual New Bern Spring Home and Garden Show is designed for homeowners in all stages of remodeling, landscaping and decorating their homes.

The show is today and Sunday at the Riverfront Convention Center with free admission. It includes hundreds of exhibits with merchandise, sample interior and exterior vignettes, and product demonstrations.

Organizers said that with a combination of new products and expert advice from the pros, the show provides homeowners with countless ideas on enhancing their home's comfort and functionality, as well as its aesthetic appeal and overall value.

There are 140 booths featuring 117 vendors, with a range of ideas, products and services from dog boarding and metal working to solar power and home security technology.
There are businesses that feature building everything from gazebos and sunrooms to bathrooms and kitchens.

There are some innovative products such as the robotic lawn mowers from LawnBott, which will provide a live demonstration. The robot mowers will be at the Pamlico Parts Co. booth.
There are also vendors to address common homeowner needs such as decks and screen porches, plumbing and appliances, nursery plants, gutters, electrical works, awnings and windows.

Show times are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.

The show is a production of Freedom ENC Communications.

Friday, March 18, 2011

New Bern Home and Garden Show

Join us this weekend!




New Bern Spring Home and Garden - New Bern, NC, March 19 & 20, 2011
Riverfront Convention Center, 203 S Front St., New Bern, NC

The Home and Garden Show is an event designed for homeowners in all stages of remodeling, landscaping and decorating their homes. Each event includes hundreds of exhibits with merchandise, sample interior and exterior vignettes, and product demonstrations. With a combination of new products and expert advice from the pros, the Home and Garden Show inspires homeowners with countless ideas on enhancing their home's comfort and functionality, as well as its aesthetic appeal and overall value.  For vendor information, contact ENC Marketing at 252-635-5658 or encmarketing@freedomenc.com.

Thursday, March 17, 2011

PepsiCo unveils 100 percent plant-based bottle

Thanks for sharing, Rose

PepsiCo unveils 100 percent plant-based bottle


This product image provided by PepsiCo., shows the company's new beverage bottle made entirely of plant material. The bottle is made from switch grass AP – This product image provided by PepsiCo., shows the company's new beverage bottle made entirely of plant …
PURCHASE, N.Y. – Remember the Cola Wars? Get ready for the Bottle Wars.
PepsiCo Inc. on Tuesday unveiled a bottle made entirely of plant material, which it says bests the technology of competitor Coca-Cola and reduces its potential carbon footprint.

The bottle is made from switch grass, pine bark, corn husks and other materials. Ultimately, Pepsi plans to also use orange peels, oat hulls, potato scraps and other leftovers from its food business.

The new bottle looks, feels and protects the drink inside exactly the same as its current bottles, said Rocco Papalia, senior vice president of advanced research at PepsiCo. "It's indistinguishable."
PepsiCo says it is the world's first bottle of a common type of plastic called PET made entirely of plant-based materials. Coca-Cola Co. currently produces a bottle using 30 percent plant-based materials and recently estimated it would be several years before it has a 100 percent plant bottle that's commercially viable.  "We've cracked the code," said Papalia.

The discovery potentially changes the industry standard for plastic packaging. Traditional plastic, called PET, is used in beverage bottles, food pouches, coatings and other common products.  The plastic is the go-to because it's lightweight and shatter-resistant, its safety is well-researched and it doesn't affect flavors. It is not biodegradable or compostable. But it is fully recyclable, a characteristic both companies maintain in their new creations.

Traditional PET plastic is made using fossil fuels, like petroleum, a limited resource that's rising in price. By using plant material instead, companies reduce their environmental impact. Pepsi says the new plastic will cost about the same as traditional plastic.

The company, based in Purchase, N.Y., said it has had dozens of people working on the process for years. While PepsiCo wouldn't specify the cost to research and design the new bottle, Papalia said it is in the millions of dollars.

It's one of several steps PepsiCo has taken recently to reduce its environmental impact. The company created a fully compostable bag for its SunChips line. It cut the amount of plastic in its Aqua-Fina bottle in 2009. And its Naked Juice line is in the midst of switching to a bottle made entirely of recycled plastic bottles.

PepsiCo says of its 19 biggest brands, those that generate more than $1 billion in revenue, 11 are beverage brands that use PET. The company says the packaging will cost roughly the same as it does today.

PepsiCo plans to test the product in 2012 in a few hundred thousand bottles. Once the company is sure it can successfully produce the bottle at that scale, it will begin converting all its products over.


Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Are You Your Grandmother?

Thanks to RE3.org for this blog.

I'm My Own Grandma Accepting The Inevitable

scrap aluminum foil.jpg

My darling grandma has always saved (& reused) every little scrap of aluminum foil and wax paper she could, and I always thought it was the craziest thing. I vowed to never have a messy drawer full of sad little remnants. But now that I'm grown, I can't bear to toss totally reusable foil, or plastic bags, or I reuse produce bags to wrap bowls of rising dough, and small peices of parchment when I'm only baking two biscuits, and foil always comes in handy.

There's no way I'm going to start recklessly throwing away perfectly good materials, but my drawer is a mess and- there's no other way to put this- not hot. How can I balance my attempts to be a city-girl-in-cute-boots with my wise-&-thrifty-grandma inclinations? Perhaps the main thing is to stop worrying about it, because there's really nothing wrong with doing things like my grandma: she's usually onto something.

What household habits, passed down through the generations, did you swear you'd never inherit...but find you have? Do they drive you crazy, or have you come to admit they're good ideas? (Like constantly turning off lights to save energy that my dad has always done- and now I do, too...)

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Pesticide Disposal Today!

By Tom Glasgow - Special to the Sun Journal

Tom Glasgow


Craven County Cooperative Extension and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (NCDA&CS) will present a pesticide disposal event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today, March 15. The event will be held at the Craven County Agricultural Building, 300 Industrial Drive in the Industrial Park. This is an excellent opportunity to dispose of unwanted, outdated or excess pesticides free of charge, with the assurance that the materials will be processed in an environmentally responsible manner.

Of course, the best way to dispose of your purchased pesticide products is to gradually use them up according to the labeled rate on appropriate, labeled sites. But over time, pesticides do tend to accumulate, especially home lawn, landscape and garden pesticides. Oftentimes we purchase more than we really need, or a particular problem appears solved after a few applications and the product goes on a shelf and stays there. 

And all too frequently, pesticides are purchased and applied before a problem has actually been diagnosed, on the hope that “maybe this will help.” In reality, there’s very little chance that a shot-in-the-dark pesticide application will accomplish anything positive. 
Unneeded, excess pesticides change and degrade over time, and they also become a potential storage issue as the containers themselves degrade or become damaged. It’s one thing to forget and neglect old furniture in the attic. It’s quite another to forget and neglect multiple containers of pesticides in the garage or storage shed.

Exercise caution when transporting pesticides to the disposal event.  Containers should be secured to prevent shifting, sliding and breaking. You should also ensure that pesticide fumes are not allowed to enter and accumulate inside your vehicle.  The back of a pickup truck would be ideal, but if this option is not available, load the materials into your trunk. 

It’s important that you keep the materials dry and out of the rain, in particular for powders, dusts and other dry products contained in bags. So if you are using a pickup truck and there’s any chance of rain or sprinkles, cover the products with a tarp.

At the collection site, any pesticide that is still in its original container and clearly labeled can be collected. If you show up with a mystery material in an old soft drink container, things are not going to go smoothly and in fact the material will not be accepted. 

At the collection site, any pesticide that is still in its original container and clearly labeled can be collected. If you show up with a mystery material in an old soft drink container, things are not going to go smoothly and in fact the material will not be accepted. 

Please keep in mind that today's event is not designed for miscellaneous household hazardous materials. This is for pesticides only. And while we’re on the subject of disposal events, we do have a Craven County household electronics recycling event scheduled for March 26, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Craven County Agricultural Building. 




Monday, March 14, 2011

Pesticide Disposal Tomorrow

Tom Glasgow - Special to the Sun Journal

Tom Glasgow


Craven County Cooperative Extension and the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services (NCDA&CS) will present a pesticide disposal event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow, March 15. The event will be held at the Craven County Agricultural Building, 300 Industrial Drive in the Industrial Park. This is an excellent opportunity to dispose of unwanted, outdated or excess pesticides free of charge, with the assurance that the materials will be processed in an environmentally responsible manner.

Of course, the best way to dispose of your purchased pesticide products is to gradually use them up according to the labeled rate on appropriate, labeled sites. But over time, pesticides do tend to accumulate, especially home lawn, landscape and garden pesticides. Oftentimes we purchase more than we really need, or a particular problem appears solved after a few applications and the product goes on a shelf and stays there. 

And all too frequently, pesticides are purchased and applied before a problem has actually been diagnosed, on the hope that “maybe this will help.” In reality, there’s very little chance that a shot-in-the-dark pesticide application will accomplish anything positive. 
Unneeded, excess pesticides change and degrade over time, and they also become a potential storage issue as the containers themselves degrade or become damaged. It’s one thing to forget and neglect old furniture in the attic. It’s quite another to forget and neglect multiple containers of pesticides in the garage or storage shed.

Exercise caution when transporting pesticides to the disposal event.  Containers should be secured to prevent shifting, sliding and breaking. You should also ensure that pesticide fumes are not allowed to enter and accumulate inside your vehicle.  The back of a pickup truck would be ideal, but if this option is not available, load the materials into your trunk. 

It’s important that you keep the materials dry and out of the rain, in particular for powders, dusts and other dry products contained in bags. So if you are using a pickup truck and there’s any chance of rain or sprinkles, cover the products with a tarp.

At the collection site, any pesticide that is still in its original container and clearly labeled can be collected. If you show up with a mystery material in an old soft drink container, things are not going to go smoothly and in fact the material will not be accepted. 

At the collection site, any pesticide that is still in its original container and clearly labeled can be collected. If you show up with a mystery material in an old soft drink container, things are not going to go smoothly and in fact the material will not be accepted. 

Please keep in mind that tomorrow's event is not designed for miscellaneous household hazardous materials. This is for pesticides only. And while we’re on the subject of disposal events, we do have a Craven County household electronics recycling event scheduled for March 26, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Craven County Agricultural Building. 

Sunday, March 13, 2011

De-Clutter for Art's Sake.

From Peggy Barnes, the De-Clutter Bug.



Don’t miss this opportunity to declutter, recycle and, best of all, support the arts in New Bern

Collect all your unwanted oil paintings, acrylics, watercolors, pottery, fine craft jewelry, textiles, photographs, sculpture, etc. and bring them to the Bank of the Arts or the Sun Journal by Wednesday, March 16. These works will be offered for sale at the Vintage Art Market, to be held during the Sun Journal’s Home and Garden Show at the Riverfront Convention Center on March 19 and March 20. All proceeds from the Vintage Art Market will benefit the Craven Arts Council & Gallery, and donations are tax deductible.

A receipt will be provided upon delivery of your artwork.
For additional information about this event, contact the Craven Arts Council & Gallery
at 252-638-2577.

Art donations accepted at:

Bank of the Arts
317 Middle Street
New Bern, NC
Tuesday - Saturday

Sun Journal
3200 Wellons Boulevard
New Bern, NC
Monday - Friday

Saturday, March 12, 2011

Humpback Whale Moves On

NEWS-TIMES

Published: Tuesday, March 8, 2011 2:24 PM EST


MIKE SHUTAK

Cedar Island — A recent visitor to Carteret County appears to have moved on. The humpback whale that first appeared in Core Sound Monday hasn’t been seen since that afternoon. 
Dr. Vicky Thayer with the Marine Mammal Stranding Network received a call Monday from the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries and another from WITN Channel 7 News. A humpback whale had been reported in Core Sound near Cedar Island. Dr. Thayer headed out into the field Monday afternoon to confirm the whale’s presence.
“I would guess that the whale came in through a nearby inlet,” she said. “When we saw the whale, it was headed southeast and traveling about four knots (4.6 mph). We hope that it heads back out an inlet.”
Dr. Thayer said they plan to monitor the whale’s movements and status and respond as necessary. The whale was last sighted southeast of Thoroughfare Inlet on Monday. Dr. Thayer said the whale hadn’t been seen Tuesday and hopes that it has moved back out to the open ocean and isn’t in any distress. 
Humpback whales are an endangered species, known for being vocal. Their underwater calls, known as songs, can carry long distances and can go on for hours. The whales can grow to 48-62.5 feet long and weigh up to 40 tons.
*
Humpback whales aren’t an uncommon sight in North Carolina. Dr. Thayer said the whales are most frequently seen in the winter and spring.

Friday, March 11, 2011

A Whale of a Tale...But it's the Truth




Coast Guard and marine specialists are keeping watch on a humpback whale that has been spotted swimming in Core Sound off the North Carolina coast.

U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Kevin Sullivan said the whale was discovered Monday morning, March 7th, near Cedar Island. Vicky Thayer of the national Marine Fisheries Services went by boat to visit the whale Monday afternoon and reported that the 30-foot mammal did not appear to be in distress.

Sullivan says whales occasionally become stranded in the sound during low tides, when water depth can drop to four feet or less in some places.

Atlantic coast humpback whales typically migrate each spring from the Caribbean to colder waters near Newfoundland. Humpbacks are known for their large tales and song-like voices. Adult whales range from 30 to 50 feet in length


Thursday, March 10, 2011

Arbor Day in Havelock

Celebrate Arbor Day at the Havelock Rec Center March 12 9AM...come out and help us plant some trees! Plant one on your property too!
City of Havelock

Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Great American Cleanup

KAB national logo
Keep America Beautiful's Great American Cleanup, the nation's largest community improvement program, takes place annually from March 1 through May 31, involving an estimated 3 million volunteers and attendees. The hardworking volunteers donated more than 5.7 million hours in 2010 to clean, beautify and improve more than 33,000 communities during more than 30,000 events in all 50 states and beyond. Activities included beautifying parks and recreation areas, cleaning seashores and waterways, handling recycling collections, picking up litter, planting trees and flowers, and conducting educational programs and litter-free events. 

Organize Your Own great American Cleanup Event
Do you have any community eyesores? How many times have you passed by a litter-strewn park or graffiti-splashed building and wished it would go away? Perhaps it's the local playground plagued with garbage or maybe a recycling effort needs a jump-start. Whatever the concern, a solution is just around the corner. All it takes is someone to say "enough is enough" and work with community members to eliminate the problem. It's a great way to improve your local community and be one of the millions of volunteers involved in the Great American Cleanup!
Here are a few program suggestions:
  • Host a tree planting party
  • Put a new coat of paint on a graffiti-marked wall
  • Adopt a road with your friends and plant flowers
  • Sponsor a litter collection contest
  • Clean up a river or field that has become an illegal dump site
  • Collect recyclable and reusable items on your block; deliver to a recycling center
The possibilities are endless - the choice to make a difference is yours. So roll up your sleeves and have fun. Your efforts to improve your community will become a source of pride for everyone.

Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Resources for Environmental Educators

From the Recycle Guys!






Take a look at this great resource for environmental educators. The N.C. Office of Environmental Education and Public Affairs offers a wide variety of resources.

Saturday, March 5, 2011

Free Yo-Yo's!

We're going to have lots of fun this weekend at the 24th Annual Coastal Home & Garden Show at the Crystal Coast Civic Center.  Stop by our booth, #73 and get a Yo-Yo made from recycled plastic. 

More than 75 exhibitors offering information and demonstrations on the latest home and garden products and services will be all under one roof. This is a “not to miss” show; drawing people interested in building, remodeling, redecorating and landscaping. It’s truly a beautiful show that get’s you in the mood for spring.

Call 252-247-3883 for more information

Friday, March 4, 2011

Swamp Loggers at Crystal Home and Garden Show

We're going to have lots of fun this weekend at the 24th Annual Coastal Home & Garden Show at the Crystal Coast Civic Center.  We will demonstrate our compost and have cool give-a-ways including Yo-Yo's made from recycled plastic. 

We're at Booth #73 which is right beside the booth of the SWAMP LOGGERS!  How cool is that?

More than 75 exhibitors offering information and demonstrations on the latest home and garden products and services will be all under one roof. This is a “not to miss” show; drawing people interested in building, remodeling, redecorating and landscaping. It’s truly a beautiful show that get’s you in the mood for spring.

Call 252-247-3883 for more information

Thursday, March 3, 2011

Coastal Home & Garden Show

Come see us this weekend at the 24th Annual Coastal Home & Garden Show at the Crystal Coast Civic Center.  We will demonstrate our compost and have cool give-a-ways including Yo-Yo's made from reyclced plastic.  More than 75 exhibitors offering information and demonstrations on the latest home and garden products and services will be all under one roof. This is a “not to miss” show; drawing people interested in building, remodeling, redecorating and landscaping. It’s truly a beautiful show that get’s you in the mood for spring.

Call 252-247-3883 for more information

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

From Bath Tub To Garden

From Time Magazine.

In Tucson, Saving the Bath Water Too

A gray water storage tank, left, and a 3,500-gallon pool are part of the rainwater system seen at in Tucson, Arizona.

Jill Torrance / Arizona Daily Star / AP




Would you water your garden with what goes down your shower drain or out your washing machine? In Tucson, Arizona, and an increasing number of water-starved western cities, more and more residents are saying yes.
If you've never contemplated what happens to the water that gets you or your clothes clean, you're far from alone. But for cities and environmentalists trying to head off the growing threat of drought and rising water costs, so-called graywater — differentiating it from the "black water" that goes down the toilet — is getting a lot more attention. A decade ago, Tucson, which has about a million residents in its metro area and is a liberal and environmentally conscious oasis in a red state, convinced Arizona legislators to make it legal for homeowners to irrigate their trees and plants with the water that was going down their drains or out of their washing machines without a permit. Now, graywater use is not only legal in Tucson, and indeed the rest of Arizona, but promoted, and, in some cases, required. In 2007, the state rolled out a tax credit of up to $1,000 for homeowners who install graywater systems. Last year, a law — believed to be the country's first — went into effect in Tucson that requires builders to include graywater plumbing in new construction.

"If there are higher stages of drought, there will be more watering restrictions," says Ilene Grossman, who is the city water department's conservation program manager. "We're not at the critical stage right now, but we are planning for that."

There's not good data on how close our nation's cities are to a water crisis, or how many people are using graywater. But the picture is this: Climate change, the cost of water treatment and rising populations will eventually, if nothing is done, run some US cities, particularly western ones, dry. Tucson, for instance, is already in what's called stage one drought, which means it's too dry but not yet critical. If a worse drought were to occur, there would be restrictions on gardening. Outside of desert areas like Tucson, there's issues of climate change and the cost of building sewage treatment plants to accommodate an expanding population. "It's crazy that we do so much to get water, and then it gets dumped down the drain," says Laura Allen, a founding member of Greywater Action, who set up her own Oakland, California home's graywater system illegally and has advocated for California's recent rule changes.

A number of city and state legislatures are coming to the same conclusion. Depending on the climate and the size of the yard, graywater reuse can lower a household's total consumption by as much as 40%. In November, Pacific Institute, which is an influencing water conservation research group, said that graywater reuse was an important strategy in improving a city's water resiliency against climate change. At a time of tight budgets, increased graywater usage could reduce the need for cities to spend money on costly new water supply projects. "It's almost at the tipping point where there are more states in the west that have graywater regulations than those that do," says Val Little, director of the Water Conservation Alliance for Southern Arizona (Water CASA).

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Hours and Locations to Purchase Our Compost

CoastalGrow Available
At Our 3 Locations
Craven County

           Compost can be obtained at the Tuscarora Landfill on Old US 70. Take US  70 to the Tuscarora exit. Turn north and go about 3/4 mile to Old US 70. Turn left and go about 1/2 mile to the landfill.
Hours:  Monday—Friday 8:00 a.m. til 4:00p.m.
Saturdays 8:00 a.m. til 1:00 p.m.
Telephone: 252-633-1564


Carteret County

Compost is also available at the Newport Transfer Station located off of Hibbs Road, between US 70 & NC 24. The transfer Station is behind the convenience site.
Hours:  Monday—Friday 8:00 a.m. til 4:00p.m.
Saturdays 8:00 a.m. til 11:30 a.m.
Telephone: 252-223-3321

Pamlico County

Compost is also available at the Grantsboro Transfer Station located on NC HWY 306 North.
Hours:  Monday—Friday 9:00 a.m. til 3:30p.m.
Saturdays 9:00 a.m. til 11:30 a.m.
Telephone: 252-745-4149

Pricing
Pickups, Trailers & Large Trucks are welcome. Compost is sold in bulk for $30.00 per ton with a minimum charge of $1.00. Loaded on site when you  arrive. Customers may also bring their own bags & shovels if they wish to bag the compost.



Home Electronics Disposal

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