Thursday, June 30, 2011

Electronics Ban Countdown

2 more days before Electronics Ban begins.


Effective July 1, 2011 discarded computer equipment and discarded televisions are banned from North Carolina landfills.

This is directed by SESSION LAW 2010-67, SENATE BILL 887, Discarded computer equipment, as defined in G.S. 130A‑309.131.  and discarded televisions, as defined in G.S. 130A‑309.131.

Computer Equipment is defined as Any desktop computer, notebook computer, monitor or video display unit for a computer system, and the keyboard, mouse, other peripheral equipment, and a printing device such as a printer, a scanner, a combination print‑scanner‑fax machine, or other device designed to produce hard paper copies from a computer.

A Television is defined as Any electronic device that contains a tuner that locks on to a selected carrier frequency and is capable of receiving and displaying of television or video programming via broadcast, cable, or satellite, including, without limitation, any direct view or projection television with a viewable screen of nine inches or larger whose display technology is based on cathode ray tube (CRT), plasma, liquid crystal display (LCD), digital light processing (DLP), liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS), silicon crystal reflective display (SXRD), light emitting diode (LED), or similar technology marketed and intended for use by a consumer primarily for personal purposes.

For information on local electronics recycling programs please contact the following:

Carteret County:  252-728-8406 Craven County:  252-636-6659  Pamlico County 252-745-3133

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Electronics Ban Countdown

3 more days before Electronic Ban begins. 

Effective July 1, 2011 discarded computer equipment and discarded televisions are banned from North Carolina landfills.

This is directed by SESSION LAW 2010-67, SENATE BILL 887, Discarded computer equipment, as defined in G.S. 130A‑309.131.  and discarded televisions, as defined in G.S. 130A‑309.131.

Computer Equipment is defined as Any desktop computer, notebook computer, monitor or video display unit for a computer system, and the keyboard, mouse, other peripheral equipment, and a printing device such as a printer, a scanner, a combination print‑scanner‑fax machine, or other device designed to produce hard paper copies from a computer.

A Television is defined as Any electronic device that contains a tuner that locks on to a selected carrier frequency and is capable of receiving and displaying of television or video programming via broadcast, cable, or satellite, including, without limitation, any direct view or projection television with a viewable screen of nine inches or larger whose display technology is based on cathode ray tube (CRT), plasma, liquid crystal display (LCD), digital light processing (DLP), liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS), silicon crystal reflective display (SXRD), light emitting diode (LED), or similar technology marketed and intended for use by a consumer primarily for personal purposes.

For information on local electronics recycling programs please contact the following:

Carteret County:  252-728-8406 Craven County:  252-636-6659  Pamlico County 252-745-3133

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

New Arrival in Newport

Out with the old, in with the new.  You will notice a few changes when you go to the Newport Transfer Station.

The first thing you see when you drive up is the new scale house.  Not only is it larger but is sits closer to the road.  This allows for greater visibility.

The old scales were replaced because, well, they were old.  The installation of the new scales allowed for elevation.  This will make it easier to clean beneath the scales.



Monday, June 27, 2011

First Impressions

You have only one chance to make a good impression...even at a landfill.  Clean vehicles are a sign of a clean operation. 

The latest addition to the Partnership is a drive-through truck washing system.  Produced by InterClean, this system can clean a truck in 60-90 seconds.  It is another way to save time and labor. 


Sunday, June 26, 2011

Rates Remain the Same This Year

Disposal Rates

Our Board of Directors recently voted to keep the disposal rates the same for FY2011-2012.  The tipping fee at the Tuscarora Landfill is $36 per ton.  A $2 excise tax mandated by NC General Stature 105-187.61 brings the rate to $38 per ton.  $12.50 per ton is included in the transfer station fees for MSW, Yard Waste, Pallets, C&D and contaminated loads.  That cost is for transportation and operating the transfer stations.

Regional Landfill,                                                     Tuscarora     Transfer Stations
Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)                                 $38.00/Ton      $50.50/Ton
Yard Waste (YW)                                                    $15.00/Ton      $27.50/Ton
Pallets                                                                    $15.00/Ton      $27.50/Ton
Special Handling (asbestos, etc.)                          $77.00/Ton      Not Accepted
Minimum Charge                                                           $ 1.00      $1.00
Penalty Charge - Contaminated Loads                $74.00/Ton     $86.50/Ton
Compost (CoastalGrow)                                        $30.00/Ton    $30.00/Ton
Mixed C & D                                                            $38.00/Ton    $50.50/Ton
Inert Debris                                                                $7.50/Ton    Not Accepted
Truck Weights                                                           $25.00           $25.00
Tires not generated in the normal $85.00 $85.00
    course of business


 
License and Miscellaneous:
       Hauler License                                                                     $25.00
      Truck Permit (Set)                                                                 $  5.00
      Uncovered Loads                                                               2 x Normal Fee
      Unacceptable Waste                                                         2 x Cost of Disposal
      Ticket Copies                                                                       $1.00 Each
      Finance Charge—Delinquent Accounts                            1.5% Per Month


Saturday, June 25, 2011

Electronics Ban Right Around the Corner

Effective July 1, 2011 discarded computer equipment and discarded televisions are banned from North Carolina landfills.

This is directed by SESSION LAW 2010-67, SENATE BILL 887, Discarded computer equipment, as defined in G.S. 130A‑309.131.  and discarded televisions, as defined in G.S. 130A‑309.131.

Computer Equipment is defined as Any desktop computer, notebook computer, monitor or video display unit for a computer system, and the keyboard, mice, other peripheral equipment, and a printing device such as a printer, a scanner, a combination print‑scanner‑fax machine, or other device designed to produce hard paper copies from a computer.

A Television is defined as Any electronic device that contains a tuner that locks on to a selected carrier frequency and is capable of receiving and displaying of television or video programming via broadcast, cable, or satellite, including, without limitation, any direct view or projection television with a viewable screen of nine inches or larger whose display technology is based on cathode ray tube (CRT), plasma, liquid crystal display (LCD), digital light processing (DLP), liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS), silicon crystal reflective display (SXRD), light emitting diode (LED), or similar technology marketed and intended for use by a consumer primarily for personal purposes.

For information on local electronics recycling programs please contact the following:

Carteret County:  252-728-8406 Craven County:  252-636-6659  Pamlico County 252-745-3133

Friday, June 24, 2011

Miriam Does It Again

She does it again.  The Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting goes to….Miriam Sumner!!!  Miriam is the Finance Officer for the Coastal Environmental Partnership.  This is Miriam’s 17th consecutive year to win the award.  Thank you for all you do Miriam!
The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) awarded this for the Partnership’s comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR).  The Certificate of Achievement is the highest form of recognition in the area of governmental accounting and financial reporting and its attainment represents a significant accomplishment by a government and its management.  The annual financial report was judged on its high standards for, among other criteria, “demonstrating a spirit of full disclosure” and “clearly communicating our financial story”.

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

How to Build a Rain Barrel

From the Jacksonville Daily News

How to build a rain barrel:
Supplies:
  • One 50-55 gallon plastic container or drum with lid
  • Brass faucet- spigot with Teflon tape
  • Bulk head fitting with two washers
  • Overflow pipe – 2 plastic elbows that can be pressure fitted together — one for the inside and one for the outside of the barrel
  • Vent screen for screened water inlet or fiberglass window screen material or mosquito netting or use a 4 inch atrium grate used in garden ponds and pool skimmers
  • Diverter from gutter to barrel
  • Pipe wrench
  • Two blocks to elevate the barrel

Steps:
  1. Cut lower drain hole: Measure about one inch above the bottom of the barrel and drill a hole through the barrel appropriate to the size of the faucet.
  2. Cut upper overflow hole: Mark the upper drain hole according to where you want the overflow to be located in relationship to the lower drain, and use a saw to cut out the overflow hole.
  3. Cut a hole in the lid appropriate for the size of the vent screen or 4 inches in diameter for the atrium grate or to cover with screening material.
  4. Install the filter in the lid.
  5. Install the bulk head fitting in the bottom of the barrel using two washers, one for the inside and one for the outside of the barrel. Yes, someone has to crawl inside the barrel. Tighten with pipe wrench.
  6. Apply Teflon tape to the faucet and screw the faucet into the bulk head using the pipe wrench.
  7. Install the overflow pipe to the top of the barrel— the outside pipe should be pointing down and the inside pipe should point up to give more volume
  8. Place the barrel — Water weights 8 pounds per gallon so place the barrel on a firm level surface and elevate the barrel on the two blocks so the faucet is operable.
  9. Modify the downspout to make a diverter to the rain barrel: Add a downspout section that is custom cut to an appropriate height above the rain barrel. An s-shaped elbow can be added to avoid splashing. Downspout should sit about two inches above the rain barrel inlet hole. Flexible corrugated plastic pipe can be used when using an atrium basket inlet design.

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Conserve Water with a Rain Barrel

Conserve water, save money with rain barrels

From the Jacksonville Daily News

Mother Nature provides Eastern North Carolina with a good 50 inches of rain annually.
“Unfortunately, she is not very good at distributing it well,” said Diana Rashash, an area specialized agent in natural resources and environmental education with Onslow Cooperative Extension.

Despite current drought conditions, building a rain barrel is a great way to take advantage of the water nature gives us when it does rain, she said. And all it takes is a half inch of rain to fill up the standard size rain barrel.

“If we got one inch of rain a week we would never need to water our gardens or lawns; unfortunately it doesn’t happen that way here,” she said. “Last year we were really low (on rain) in September, but the rain we got after that still got us to 54 inches. Rain barrels can collect the rain we do get so during the times it gets really dry you can at least choose — prioritize which plants need watering the most.”

Rain barrels are inexpensive, easy to install and there are several good reasons why one should use a rain barrel, Rashash said.

“A rain barrel collects and stores rainwater from the roof that can be used later for watering plants, washing the car, washing the dog,” she said. “The water collected doesn’t have the chemicals drinking water has, like chlorine, and it is soft water, so it is very good for watering plants and things you don’t need drinking water for. It is silly to use potable water for non-potable uses.”

In addition to salt and chlorine in treated public water, treated water and well water also contain limestone, calcium carbonate, iron and magnesium which make the water hard, said Lisa Rayburn. And a crusty white ring around the top soil of the plant is indicative of salt build up.

“Rain water doesn’t have those things,” she said. “Salt is not good for your plants. Salt will start to build up in the soil and make it harder for plants to grow and it becomes harder for the plants to take the moisture out of the soil. There is very little salt in rainwater. And there are also plants that are particularly sensitive to chlorine — the poinsettia is the first thing that comes to my mind.”

Rain barrels help conserve water and can save money by reducing water bills. Rashash added that there is proposed legislation in North Carolina to reduce per-capita water usage to 100 gallons a day and ultimately reduce it down to 45 gallons a day.

“A rough rule of thumb is for every 100 square feet of roof, a one-inch rain will give you 62 gallons of water — multiply that by 50 inches and you potentially have 3,000 gallons of water from one 10-by-10-foot roof,” Rashash said.

Ready-made rain barrels can be purchased at local hardware stores, but they can also be made from plastic containers.

When obtaining used plastic containers or drums for a rain barrel, be sure the original contents of the container was a food grade product, Rashash said. The majority of the supplies to retrofit a barrel can be obtained at most home improvement, plumbing or hardware stores.

Onslow Cooperative Extension purchased a truckload of empty plastic pickle barrels from Mount Olive to use as rain barrels and taught a class on how to make them in May. There has been enough interest they are taking names and plan to order more barrels and teach another class sometime in July, she said.

Rashash said she mail orders the bulk head fittings from Atlanta Rain Barrel and found the “vent screens” used for the class through an online source as well. But she said bulk head fittings are available at hardware stores and fine screening material can also be purchased and modified for the barrel for those who do not want to use mail ordering.

“With the screens you don’t have to worry about mosquitoes and trash building up in there,” she said.

Peggy Garner, the director of Onslow Cooperative Extension, said that though some containers are not very attractive but can easily be decorated using paint that can be applied to plastic.

“You can decorate it however you want to decorate it and get as artistic as you like,” she said.

Having paid $60 for his first rain barrel, Kenneth Barbee, of Tar Landing, took the class in May and made his own for $35.

“I like to use the rain barrel water because it is so much better for the plants than you get from well water or public water,” he said. “You don’t have all those chemicals — this is a good thing. I have a garden and a small greenhouse … and my wife has plants inside and outside the house, so we wanted another barrel — we have thoroughly enjoyed using it.”

Leon Nichols, of Pony Farm Road, built a rain barrel and purchased a ready-made rain barrel.
“I have a little garden around the house and I’m going to try and use the water from it rather than from my well or the county water,” he said. “I am just trying to conserve and keep economics in mind.”

Another student suggested using rain water for washing cars since you won’t get water spots like the calcium in tap water creates.

Onslow Cooperative Extension will provide assistance to those interested in making their own rain barrel and are accepting calls from those interested in obtaining a rain barrel or attending the next class. They will provide rain barrels as part of the class fee, but they also sell ready-made barrels. For more information or to get on the list for a barrel or the class, call 910-455-5873.

Monday, June 20, 2011

From Recycling Bin To Shelf in 30 Days...Glass

From DoYourPart.com

 

The Never-Ending Glass Recycling Story

Recycling glass is another super easy way to Do Your Part. It’s as close to instant gratification as you can get in the recycling world. A recycled glass bottle can be back on a store shelf in as little as 30 days and can be recycled over and over again!

Think about the glass that’s in your kitchen right now. Glass jars hold jelly, baby food, spices, drinks, sauces, pickles, oils and a whole lot more. It only takes a moment to rinse them out and recycle them.

Remember to take the lids off because they can jam the recycling machinery.
Recycled glass is all around us. You can find it in fiberglass insulation, concrete, matches, highway reflective paint and ceramic tiles.

Creating glass from scratch requires sand, soda ash and limestone to be heated to 2600 degrees. Making glass from recycled glass uses 40% less energy because the glass melts at a much lower temperature. So recycle all of those glass jars and bottles. You’ll be doing your part to conserve energy and cut down on pollution.

Home Electronics Disposal

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