Monday, December 31, 2012

New Year's Schedule


Happy New Year's Everyone.

The Tuscarora Landfill, Administrative Offices, the Grantsboro  Transfer Station and Newport Transfer Station will be closed New Year's Day.


We hope you have a safe and happy holiday.

Friday, December 28, 2012

New Year's Schedule

Happy Holidays Everyone.

The Tuscarora Landfill, Administrative Offices, the Grantsboro Transfer Station and Newport Transfer Station will be closed New Year's Day.

We hope you have a safe and happy holiday.

Sunday, December 23, 2012

Holiday Schedule

Happy Holidays Everyone.

The Tuscarora Landfill, the Grantsboro Transfer Station and Newport Transfer Station will be closed Christmas Day and New Year's Day. The Administrative offices will be closed  December 24, 25 and January 1.

We hope you have a safe and happy Holiday Season.

Saturday, December 22, 2012

Holiday Schedule

Happy Holidays Everyone.

The Tuscarora Landfill, the Grantsboro Transfer Station and Newport Transfer Station will be closed Christmas Day and New Year's Day. The Administrative offices will be closed  December 24, 25 and January 1.

We hope you have a safe and happy Holiday Season.

Friday, December 21, 2012

First Day Hikes

First Day Hikes to be offered at every North Carolina state park Jan. 1


 RALEIGH – First Day Hikes will be offered in every North Carolina state park and state recreation area Jan. 1, giving everyone an opportunity to exercise and celebrate nature as a New Year’s Day tradition, according to the N.C. Division of Parks and Recreation.
On the 2012 New Year’s Day, 1,392 hikers in North Carolina joined rangers and volunteers to walk a combined 4,573 miles along trails in the state parks and state recreation areas. For the second year, North Carolina’s state parks system will partner with American’s State Parks and the National Association of State Park Directors to nationally promote First Day Hikes.
“Exploring the year-round splendor of nature is quickly becoming a New Year’s Day tradition,” said Lewis Ledford, state parks director. “Every one of our state parks and state recreation areas is open on the holiday, and the ranger-guided hikes are an excellent way to keep fit during the holidays, connect with nature and develop a deeper appreciation for the rich natural resources that distinguish North Carolina.”
There will be at least 40 guided hikes in the North Carolina state parks system and more than 600 throughout the 50 states as part of the event, ranging from easy to challenging. At Falls Lake State Recreation area, a scavenger hunt will be part of a kid-friendly hike, and Hammocks Beach State Park plans an “Early Bird Hike” at 8:30 a.m. Hanging Rock State Park will present the “Five Overlooks Challenge, a 10-mile excursion across the park’s scenic peaks, while hikers at Weymouth Woods Historic Nature Preserve will visit the world’s oldest known longleaf pine. The Eno River Association will offer both long and short hikes as part of a decades-old tradition at Eno River State Park.
Details about First Day Hikes in North Carolina can be found under “Education” at www.ncparks.gov and at www.americasstateparks.org, which also lists all hikes nationally.


Thursday, December 20, 2012

Holiday Schedule

Happy Holidays Everyone.

The Tuscarora Landfill, the Grantsboro Transfer Station and Newport Transfer Station will be closed Christmas Day and New Year's Day. The Administrative offices will be closed  December 24, 25 and January 1.
We hope you have a safe and happy Holiday Season.

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Monday, December 17, 2012

New Bin Takes Recycling to Every Room

New Bin Takes Recycling to Every Room

Decorative Recycling Bin
The BinBisa Decorative Recycler was designed to make recycling a part of your daily life. Photo: BinBisa Decorative Recycler

For many people, recycling is a chore relegated to kitchen bins and outdoor receptables. But what if recycling happened in every room, several times a day?

That’s the concept behind the BinBisa, a new decorative recycler designed for the places where recycling doesn’t always happen: the bedroom, bathroom, hotel rooms, dorms, office workspaces and other smaller spaces.

The BinBinsa Decorative Recycler is the brainchild of teacher-artist Laura Rodriguez, who hopes the product will help transform the way people think about recycling. “I designed the BinBisa to replace the trash can as a human tool," Rodriguez tells Earth911.

Rodriguez spent months studying waste bin design to create an attractive and practical alternative to conventional trash bins. The result is the BinBisa, a sleek, functional bin that maximizes space without taking up more room than the average trash can. Every bin features two compartments that allow users to easily dispose of and sort everyday refuse. The bin's removable inserts make it easy to recycle the pre-sorted trash items.

“People don’t recycle for two main reasons; convenience and lack of education,” says Rodriguez. “I wanted to design a tool that would address both of these problems.” Rodriguez hopes the BinBisa will help users learn more about what can be recycled and provide an attractive, simple way to make recycling a more frequent practice. To this end, Rodriguez has created motivational quotes for the BinBisa packaging, such as "Change your tool. Change your habit. Change your world," and "One step, made by millions, is a movement."

And what is the inspiration behind the product's exotic-sounding name, BinBisa? The first part of the name is self-explanatory; bin, as in recycling bin. And Bisa? “It means ‘can’ in Indonesian,” says Rodriguez. “The verb 'can.' As in, this bin can change your habits.”
Currently, Rodriguez is selling the BinBisa Decorative Recycler at local street fairs, farmer's markets and private parties. She hopes consumer demand will eventually land the product on store shelves

Sunday, December 16, 2012

N.C. Coastal Resources Commission Science Panel to meet Dec. 19 in New Bern

N.C. Coastal Resources Commission Science Panel to meet Dec. 19 in New Bern


 RALEIGH – The N.C. Coastal Resources Commission’s Science Panel on Coastal Hazards will meet Dec. 19 in New Bern.

The panel, which provides scientific advice to the CRC, will meet from 10 a.m. – 2:45 p.m. in the conference room of the New Bern-Craven County Public Library, 400 Johnson St., New Bern. The meeting is open to the public.

Members of the public may speak during a public comment period scheduled for 2:30 p.m.
The group’s agenda includes discussion and scope of work for a study on the feasibility of eliminating the Inlet Hazard Area of Environmental Concern, and scope of work for an update on the Science Panel’s 2010 Sea Level Rise Assessment Report. Both studies are required by Session Law 2012-202 (House Bill 819).

Created by the CRC in 1997, the 13-member science panel is composed of coastal engineers and geologists.


Friday, December 14, 2012

Monday, December 10, 2012

Electronics Accepted at Monettes Convenience Center

Craven County is now accepting electronics at their Monettes Convenience Center located in the James City area.
For further information please call Craven County Solid Waste at 252-636-6659.


Sunday, December 9, 2012

From the Lawn to the Fireplace

An Eco-Friendly Fireplace Log Made from Grass Clippings

The grass-based fireplace log created by chemists at the Agricultural Research Service uses between 20 and 60 percent grass clippings for a cleaner, more eco-friendly alternative to wood logs. Photo: ARS

Researchers have found a way to get winter warmth from a summer source – grass clippings.
Chemists at Agricultural Research Services have developed a fire log that burns the same as traditional wood logs with a fraction of the impact on the environment. Made from 20 to 60 percent grass clippings, the logs also combine various plant-derived waxes and oils, unlike other fireplace ready logs, which make use of petroleum waxes and oils.

Grass clippings often make their way to landfills inside plastic garbage bags during the summer months. ARS says creating these logs is a way to free up space in landfills. It could also potentially help with deforestation and other energy-heavy manufacturing processes.
Clippings and other ingredients are dried to a moisture content of less than 15 percent, which allows the logs to ignite quickly, but also means the manufacturing temperature can be lowered below that of standard logs.

“Unlike many products manufactured today for burning in your fireplace, pellet stove, or campfire, the bio-based fire logs that Imam’s team developed contain no petroleum-derived chemicals. That means the eco-logs burn cleaner, emitting fewer potentially polluting volatile organic compounds, or VOCs,” ARS says in a press release.

Grass is an ample resource for the team, but ARS says logs can also be made from agricultural leftovers like corncobs, rice straw and cornstalk residue.
The same formula used in the logs can also be created as pellets for starting fires or using a pellet-burning stove.

Saturday, December 8, 2012

Staff in state Division of Water Quality receive 2012 Pigeon River Award

Staff in state Division of Water Quality receive 2012 Pigeon River Award


 RALEIGH – Staff with the state Division of Water Quality’s Asheville office have been honored with the 2012 Pigeon River Award for significant contributions to protecting Haywood County’s land and water resources.
The Haywood Waterways Association presented the award Thursday night to the state agency’s Asheville staff because of the agency’s work to improve water quality in the Pigeon River and its efforts to facilitate more effective use of technical, scientific and educational resources for the watershed. 
The award is presented each year at the Haywood Waterways Association’s annual membership dinner. The Haywood Waterways Association chose staff in the Division of Water Quality because of the following accomplishments:
· being an active member of the Richland Creek Restoration Group
· reintroducing fish to Richland Creek
· walking watersheds and doing effective monitoring to track sources of bacterial contamination
· studying septic systems’ influence on groundwater quality
· working with students during Kids in the Creek educational events
· organizing the Water Quality Collaborative to make optimal use of local resources for water quality protection
· participating in various planning initiatives
“Even though protecting water quality is part of the job for the staff, we felt they should be recognized for their extensive participation in promoting watershed improvements in Haywood County,” said Eric Romaniszyn, director of the Haywood Waterways Association.
Landon Davidson, the regional supervisor for the state Division of Water Quality’s Aquifer Protection Section, and Chuck Cranford, regional supervisor for the agency’s Surface Water Protection Section, were grateful the association recognized the state agency with the award.
“The Haywood Waterways Association is really a model program: efficiently managed, focused on results and composed of action-oriented stakeholders leveraging their various talents,” Davidson said.
Cranford added: “DWQ is very proud to accept this award, and we look forward to continuing to support Haywood Waterways and similar groups as they work to restore and protect their community’s surface water and groundwater resources.”

Friday, December 7, 2012

Electronics Accepted At Monettes Convenience Center

Craven County will accept electronics at their Monettes Convenience Center located in the James City area.

For further information please call Craven County Solid Waste at 252-636-6659

Thursday, December 6, 2012

Ice Milk

Make an igloo out of milk jugs

Create an indoor igloo for a playhouse or reading space using cleaned-out milk jugs, cardboard, glue and some time and patience.


Photo: oddharmonic/Flickr
I saw this video over the weekend, and I love the way the teachers and students at Midland Middle School reused milk jugs to create an igloo in the classroom as a reading space for kindergarteners and first graders.
 
They collected 428 milk jugs, made sure they were very clean, and created a carefully constructed, totally cool indoor igloo. If you can collect enough milk jugs in time, this would be a great way to keep occupied with your kids over the upcoming holiday break from school.
 
 
It only took the school three weeks to collect all the milk jugs they needed for this project. It would certainly take longer for someone who wanted to do it in their home, but I can imagine that a request on Facebook to friends and neighbors might speed up the process. If my boys were littler (and we had the room in the house), I would probably give this a shot, and I’d probably have them go around the neighborhood with me on recycling day with a wagon to fish milk jugs out of the recycling bins.

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Yeah!!! Red Lobster and Olive Garden


Red Lobster, Olive Garden Recycle Cooking Oil

red lobster, red, lobster, darden, darden restaurants, restaurant, seafood, chain
Photo: Darden Restaurants
Rising sustainability trends in the food service industry have left many greenies wondering: Are zero-waste restaurants possible?

Darden Restaurants, which includes popular eateries such as Red Lobster, Olive Garden, LongHorn Steakhouse and Bahama Breeze, is out to prove that while low-impact ambitions are challenging in the industry, going zero-waste is still an achievable goal.

Since 2009, the company has been putting programs in place to one day send zero waste to landfills, including a company-wide cooking oil recycling program that has collected millions of gallons of used oil. Launched in 2010, the program reclaims 100 percent of the used cooking oil from Darden's 2,000 restaurants - for a total of about 5 million pounds per year.
With biofuel markets on the rise, Darden is able to carry out the program at no cost and actually receives a small annual rebate for selling its oil to make new products.
"We use our fry oil for a host of different things," Brandon Tidwell, sustainability manager for Darden Restaurants, told Earth911. "A good bit of it goes to biofuel and biodiesels. Some of it is used for soaps and cosmetics, and some of it goes for animal feed."
Thanks, in part, to its successful cooking oil recycling program, Darden increased its enterprise-wide landfill diversion rate by 14 percent from 2008 to 2011, representing a total volume of more than 140,000 cubic yards of landfill space.

It's all part of Darden's ongoing efforts to reduce the environmental impact of its eateries. A year before releasing its zero-waste aspirations, the company announced plans to reduce water and energy use by 15 percent per-restaurant in seven years. It has already surpassed its water conservation goals, about four years ahead of schedule, and is more than halfway toward reaching its energy efficiency ambitions.

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

NC Environmental Issues By NC State Parks

UNC-TV series examines environmental issues in North Carolina State Parks


 RALEIGH – A three-part series on North Carolina state parks, produced by UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication students, will air Dec. 3-5 at 7:30 p.m. on UNC-TV’s “North Carolina Now.”

The reports look at environmental issues facing Gorges State Park in the mountains of Transylvania County, Eno River State Park in Orange and Durham counties, and Fort Macon State Park on Bogue Banks near Morehead City.

  The series was written and produced by students in the school’s Medical and Science Journalism Program as part of professor Tom Linden's “Science Documentary Television” course.
  “This series focuses on three of our state’s natural and historical treasures,” said Linden, who narrated the reports and served as executive producer. UNC-TV videographers Mike Oniffrey and Pete Bell shot the series, along with additional videography supplied by the students and Patrick McMillan, a Clemson University biology professor. 

  "The learning experience between state parks, UNC, Dr. Linden and his students demonstrates the tremendous opportunities made possible through partnerships," said Lewis Ledford, state parks director. "We greatly appreciate the commitment and hard work of the students and the public outreach and education benefits created through this partnership and we look forward to similar cooperative projects in the future."

  Ledford and Jonathan Howes, former secretary of the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources and former chair of the N.C. Parks and Recreation Authority, assisted the class with the project.

  The first part of the series examines how a temperate rain forest in Gorges State Park supports one of the most diverse ecosystems in the eastern United States. The second report tells the story of an exotic plant from Asia that threatens to upset the natural ecosystem in the Eno River.The final report traces the long battle to save Fort Macon from the ocean's relentless onslaught.

  For more information about North Carolina's state parks, visit www.ncparks.gov.

Home Electronics Disposal

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