Saturday, August 31, 2013

Metal Recycling Began Centuries Ago

Fusselman Salvage Co.: Metal Recycling Began Centuries Ago
The practice of reusing obsolete metals has been practiced since approximately 3000 B.C.

Metal recycling probably dates back to 3000 B.C. or earlier to the time when iron making began. Those that formed metal found they could reuse the surplus material that was left over in their manufacturing process or reclaimed from obsolete objects. It is said that plunderers along the Mediterranean coast dismantled the Colossus of Rhodes, selling it to weapons makers who melted it down.

Historical figures did it; so can you
Since that time, human beings have been salvaging obsolete metals for recycling. Geoffrey Chaucer, known for his “Canterbury Tales,” was employed as clerk of the works at Westminster Palace in the 14th century and was responsible for the collection and inventory of scrap metal.

The infamous Captain Kidd was also known to deal with metals other than gold and silver. When he was captured in 1699, his ship was carrying 10 tons of scrap iron in the form of “wagon tyres” for use in colonial iron works.

George Washington, Paul Revere and other founding fathers of the U.S. knew the value of scrap. Silversmith Revere advertised for scrap metal of all kinds, and Washington urged the reuse of old worn chains from frigates.


Scrap iron at Fusselman Salvage Co. in Missouri.
Historic war scrap use
Historically, scrap use in the U.S. has been greatest during times of war, although there have been occasions when a scrap market did not exist for most commodities.

Collections of metal date to the days of the American Revolution. Colonial women contributed their iron kettles and pots to be melted down for the production of armaments. Such use continued to the days of the Civil War, when both the North and the South urged citizens to donate scrap objects to the war effort.

Resource shortages caused by the World Wars greatly encouraged metal recycling. Countries involved in World War II carried out massive government promotion campaigns urging citizens to donate used metal as a matter of patriotic importance.

Programs for resource conservatism established during the war were continued afterward in some countries due to a lack of natural resources — Japan being a notable example.

Higher energy costs equals more recycling

Guest author Dave Fusselman of Fusselman Salvage Co.

In the U.S., metal recycling took on even greater importance after energy costs shot up in the 1970s. Aluminum is one of the top energy savers — recycling it uses 5% of the energy consumed by producing metal from ore, so the benefits are indisputably significant.

As we all know, energy costs have only gone higher since then, intensifying the urgency of preserving natural resources and saving money through recycling. Thank goodness for the clever people who started the practice centuries ago and the entrepreneurs who developed recycling into an industry that has created jobs for about half a million people in the U.S. and provided extra income to millions more.

Dave Fusselman is the owner of Fusselman Salvage Co., a Missouri-based metal recycling facility. Visit his website for more information on recycling metal.

Friday, August 30, 2013

Creative ways to reuse golf balls


Creative ways to reuse golf balls

Don't let these dimpled wonders go to waste once their playing days are over.
By Networx.com

So, I’m dating a golfer. You don’t know me, but trust me when I say that this is unexpected. Golf is such a preppy game and preppy? I am not. But hey, opposites attract and really that has nothing to do with anything. The point is: golf balls.

I never thought about the life cycle of a golf ball until now, but you know — those things aren’t indestructible. They get dented and torn on all that golf course landscaping and generally degrade, and then it’s all: “Bye bye little ball, off to the rubbish bin for you!”

Well, being the super-green eco-friendly DIY recycler girl that I am, I just couldn’t bear to see them thrown away. Can you imagine how many millions of golf balls must be buried in landfills across the country? No way, not cool. Always crafty and looking to upcycle, I looked into golf ball-related projects, and whataya know? There’s all sorts of fantastic things you can do with used golf balls! Things like:

1. The garden always provides excellent grounds for creative upcycling, and golf — an outdoor lawn sport — is a natural pairing for garden embellishments. If you’re patient enough to collect a whole bunch of balls, they’ll make an adorable edging for your flower beds, vegetable boxes or garden foot paths.

2. Or, for a garden project that’s a bit more involved, how about taking a swing (just a little golf humor) at one of these golf-ball studded bird houses? Not only do they look cute, but they’ll also attract beautiful birds to your yard as well! Need help making a birdhouse for your garden in an area like Denver? Handymen can help you elevate your project into a masterpiece.

3. You can also use golf balls in your garden for a less aesthetic, much more practical purpose. Before potting a plant, line the bottom of the flower pot with a few layers of golf balls, then proceed with potting soil as normal. The golf balls will make for excellent drainage and you won’t have to worry about root rot!

4. Gifts are always a good way to go when you’re trying to reuse a specialty item. Sports equipment, for example, can be turned into a thoughtful present for a sports enthusiast. In this case, golf balls can be used to adorn items for your favorite golfer — like gluing the balls around the outside of a large picture frame, and then filling the frame with a photo of your golfer (showing off their perfect technique, of course!).

5. Speaking of gifts, homemade ornaments are always great for the holidays, and golf balls make for perfect little ornaments. Just glue a hook to the ball for the simplest version. Leave the balls white for a golf theme, and glue a tee to the side to add a little color and dimension. Or, spray paint the balls red, green and gold for a more traditional ornament. Another option is to glue three golf balls together to make a snowman! Decorate with little “coal” eyes and “carrot” nose, and a wee scarf wrapped around the neck. Easy and oh-so-adorable.

6. You know what blows? The wind! (More bad puns, my father would be so proud). But seriously, nothing ruins a perfect picnic quite like a big ol’ gust of wind that catches your tablecloth, picks it right up, and upturns all your food along with it. Which is why genius grannies have been sewing weights into the corners of their tablecloths for years, in order to avoid just such a situation. So you see where I’m going with this? Yeah, sew golf balls into the corners of your outdoor tablecloths. Problem solved, bring on the wind. You’re welcome.

7. And finally, you can always pass them along to the kids. Golf balls are excellent for craft projects, such as these adorable animal tutorials: a dog, an ant, or a ladybug.

And please remember, if the issue with the ball is simply cosmetic, like a scuff or some discoloration, consider passing them along to a charity like Bunkers In Baghdad. This organization sends used golf equipment — including balls — to American troops stationed in 22 countries around the world, and they’re always accepting donations

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Band of Angels

Band of Angels Pairs Students with Recycled Instruments
By Wendy Gabriel

Contributions to Band of Angels help to give the gift of music that will last a lifetime.

Do you have an used or unappreciated instrument taking up space in your home? Maybe it is in the back of a closet, under a bed, in the basement, up in the attic or even hung as a decoration on a wall.

If you live in or around the Kansas City metro area, you can recycle your unwanted instrument by donating it to a program that helps make dreams come true for children who want to play music. This magical program is called Band of Angels.

Band of Angels is a partnership between Kansas City’s FOX 4 TV and local music chain Meyer Music. The goal is to collect musical instruments and give them to budding musicians who cannot afford to rent or purchase an instrument of their own. The organization also accepts cash donations in an effort to make instruments available to all children who have an interest in music.

Through hard work and much promotion, the program has become quite the success. Band of Angels gave out approximately 300 instruments in its first year to schools for students to participate in band and orchestra. To date, the program has collected around 650 instruments.

Band of Angels works to pair the right instruments with the perfect applicants to ensure a “musical match made in heaven.” All donated instruments are evaluated, repaired, cleaned and restored to playing condition before they are given to a child.

If you are located in the Kansas City area, you can bring your used instruments to the following drop-off locations:

Meyer Music, 1512 Hwy 40, Blue Springs, MO 64015

Meyer Music, 10122 W. 119th St., Overland Park, KS 66213

Meyer Music, 6312-14 NW Barry Rd., Kansas City, MO 64154

For more information about Band of Angels, visit bandofangelskc.org

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Roll Your Sleeves Up

Can you believe kids? They need new wardrobes, like, every season. We've got some DIY tricks up our sleeves today to show you how to transform their summer tees into shirts they can wear well into the fall. http://ht.ly/ojh0L

DIY: Add Some Sleeves to Kids' Summer Tees - Earth911.com
ht.ly

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

The Great Indoors

Earth911

To get your brain in gear this week, here's a mind-bender for you. How many plastic bottles did artist Aurora Robson use to make the gallery installation called "The Great Indoors"? You'll find the answer here. http://ht.ly/oguzI
Artist Rethinks the Waste Stream Through Strange, Beautiful Sculptures -...
ht.ly

Find out how Aurora Robson reuses everything from junk mail to ocean waste to create art that makes a difference for our planet..

Monday, August 26, 2013

DIY household cleaners

Ready for some #DIY tips? Check out these 4 earth-friendly household cleaners you can make on your own. http://ht.ly/nW3al
4 Easy, Earth-Friendly Cleaners You Can Make at Home - Earth911.com
ht.ly

DIY household cleaners

Sunday, August 25, 2013

.Just over a year ago, the world watched the Olympics in London. What's become of the Olympic Village since then?

London Olympic Village Reborn as Affordable Housing - Earth911.com

Athletes, officials and revelers have moved on from the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Village, but that doesn’t mean the space will go to waste.

http://earth911.com/art-entertainment/london-olympic-village-affordable-housing/

Saturday, August 24, 2013

Public meeting for Cape Fear study

State coastal agency plans Aug. 29 public meeting for Cape Fear study
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RALEIGH – The state Division of Coastal Management will hold a second public meeting Aug. 29 as part of a study of the feasibility of creating a special management area, known as an Area of Environmental Concern, that would include the lands adjacent to the mouth of the Cape Fear River.

The meeting will be from 9 a.m. – noon Aug. 29 at the Southport Community Building, 223 East Bay Street, in Southport.

Stakeholders and members of the public are invited to attend the meeting for a roundtable discussion about regulatory concerns and specifics of the proposalsthat were presented Bald Head Island and Caswell Beach officials at the division’s first meeting on this topic in June.

Session Law 2012-202 requires the N.C. Coastal Resources Commission, or CRC, to perform a study which considers the unique coastal morphologies and hydrographic conditions of the Cape Fear River region and determines if action is necessary to preserve, protect and balance the economic and natural resources of this region. The commission was directed to consider eliminating overlapping Areas of Environmental Concern by incorporating appropriate development standards into one single AEC unique to this location.

The state agency held the first public meeting on this study June 26. Information from both public meetings will be compiled in a report to the commission for consideration of the proposed AEC, and in a final report to the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources, the N.C. General Assembly and the governor.

Areas of Environmental Concern are the foundation of the CRC’s permitting program for coastal development. An AEC is an area of natural importance that may be susceptible to erosion or flooding; or it may have environmental, social, economic or aesthetic values that make it valuable to the state. The CRC classifies areas as AECs to protect them from incompatible development, which may cause irreversible damage to property, public health or the environment. AECs cover almost all coastal waters and about 3 percent of the land in the state’s 20 coastal counties.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Office of Environmental Education and Public Affairs - Phone: 919-707-8626 -- 1601 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-1601

Jamie Kritzer, Public Information Officer, 919-707-8602, Jamie.Kritzer@ncdenr.gov

Pat McCrory, Governor -- John E. Skvarla, III, Secretary

An Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer

Friday, August 23, 2013

NC Monofilament Recovery & Recycling Program

NC Monofilament Recovery & Recycling Program

When marine animals die from becoming entangled in discarded fishing line, we all lose. But we can greatly reduce the number of useless deaths with your participation on the NC Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Program. It’s easy, it’s convenient, and it’s the right thing to do.


Portable monofilament recycling bin, by Keith Rittmaster
Recycle your fishing lineIf you’ve ever witnessed an animal that’s been entangled in improperly discarded fishing line, you’ll understand why ther monofilament recycling program is so important. Don’t leave your old fishing line on the beach, unsecured on the boat, or in the ocean. And when it’s time to get rid of it, look for one of the convenient recycling bins. Fishing line thrown in the trash works its way to the top of the landfill and often finds its way back into the environment. With your help, we can greatly reduce the number of useless deaths of some of our most important marine species.

Look for the convenient recycling bins
Monofilament Recycling and Recovery Program volunteers have placed over 60 recycling bins across the North Carolina coast and they’re adding more all the time. You’ll find them at piers, docks, boat ramps, marinas and the best retailers on the coast. So far, volunteers have collected over 700 miles of discarded fishing line. Recycle your fishing line and help ensure that the most amazing coastal environment in America, stays that way. Looking for your nearest bin?

Check out our map of Fishing Line Recycling Bin locations at the bottom of this page.
Contact us
Know the perfect place for a Fishing Line Recycling Bin? Willing to be a recycling bin monitor volunteer? Looking for fishing line recycling classroom materials? Let us know! Potential hazard becomes environmental asset.
When volunteers collect the fishing line, they send it to Berkley - a leader in the fishing industry and in recycling. They turn it into items like park benches and even fish habitats. Protect Wild Dolphins with this special License PlateWhy it's important: Yaholo's Story
3: January 2005 – Yang and Yaholo return, but the calf is entangled in fishing line and isn't swimming well. Photo: Keith Rittmaster. For the complete story, click here.1: October 2004 – Yang and her healthy calf, Yaholo, swimming in the ocean near Beaufort inlet. Photo: Keith Rittmaster. For the complete story, click here.2: October 2004 – Yang is identified by her dorsal fin. We've known her for a decade! Photo: Keith Rittmaster. For the complete story, click here.3: January 2005 – Yang and Yaholo return, but the calf is entangled in fishing line and isn't swimming well. Photo: Keith Rittmaster. For the complete story, click here.4: January 2005 – The fishing line is forcing his back to bow, and is cutting deep into his mouth, tail, back and sides – slowly killing the young calf. Photo: Keith Rittmaster. For the complete story, click here.5: January 2005 – Despite the best efforts of researchers and volunteers, the dolphin calf dies. For the complete story, click here.Please recycle your fishing line and support the monofilament recycling program. Their lives depend on you. Photo: NOAA/NMFS, Beaufort Labs. For the complete story, click here.Fishing Line Recycling Bins
Map DataMap Data

Terms of UseReport a map errorFrom address:
Get directions
Terms of Service, Privacy Policy & EthicsContactBuilt with HTML5 and CSS3 - Copyright © 2012 Sturgell Design for the volunteers of Cape Lookout Studies. All rights reserved. Photos by Keith Rittmaster under NOAA license unless otherwise noted. The opinions and views expressed on this website are the opinions of the content authors and not necessarily the opinions and views of the NC Maritime Museums, or the NC Department of Cultural Resources.

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Zippity Do Line

Earth911
Ziplines are so 2012. For a new twist on treetop adventures, check out canopy cycling with Quebec's VĂ©loVolant.
New Eco-Activity: Pedal Through the Trees
bit.ly

Soaring through the treetops used to be reserved for birds, Tarzan and intrepid zip-liners, but those without wings and a need for extreme....

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Sea trash spiraling out of control, study finds

Sea trash spiraling out of control, study finds

Earth now has five or six major ocean garbage patches, and new research suggests they'll continue growing for 'at least the next thousand years.'
Thu, Jan 10 2013 at 10:33 AM Related Topics:Garbage Patches, Marine Life, Oceans, Plastics, Pollution

A plastic bag floats near the ocean surface, where it's more susceptible to fast-moving currents. (Photo: Ben Mierement/U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)

After a yacht captain stumbled across the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in the late 1990s, scientists soon began finding similar patches of plastic waste in oceans around the world. They've since identified at least five, each fed by currents that carry plastic bags, bottles and other trash into vast vortices of seawater known as gyres.

Since most plastic isn't biodegradable, this trash keeps swirling around for years, often crumbling into smaller pieces but refusing to fully break down. Much like carbon dioxide emissions — which linger stubbornly in the sky as they fuel climate change — garbage patches have come to symbolize the effects of man-made pollution run amok.

And now, thanks to a new study by Australian scientists, we have a clearer picture of just how amok all this pelagic plastic really is. Using GPS-equipped drifter buoys to model the travels of maritime trash, researchers at Australia's Center of Excellence for Climate System Science report a sobering discovery: Even if no plastic waste entered the oceans after today, Earth's garbage patches would still continue growing for hundreds of years, both because of plastic's longevity and its long transit time to the gyres.

"These patches are not going away," says lead author Erik van Sebille, an oceanographer at the University of New South Wales, in a video statement about the study. "The garbage patches will stay there for at least the next thousand years."

Despite a name that makes them sound like seafaring landfills, garbage patches are actually nebulous and low-profile, consisting mostly of small plastic bits floating below the surface. And while that may seem less dramatic, the diffuse nature of garbage patches makes them more nefarious and harder to deal with, van Sebille points out.

"If you sail through these areas, you will not see big lumps of plastics or rubber duckies or things like that," he says in a press release. "The sun and interaction with the ocean breaks the plastics down into very small pellets that are almost invisible to the naked eye. However, these plastics even at this small size do affect ecosystems — fish and albatross swallow these plastics, while phytoplankton can use the floating pellets to stay buoyant and float near the surface, where they grow best.

"Plastic is also the canary in the coal mine," he adds. "Poisonous chemicals, [which] are much more hazardous to the ecology, ride the currents in the same way and are actually absorbed by the plastic pellets."


The five major ocean gyres, where currents cause floating plastic to accumulate. (Illustration: NOAA)

Not only will the five biggest, best-known garbage patches continue growing for centuries, but the researchers also say a sixth one is in the offing. "Interestingly, our research suggests a smaller sixth garbage patch may form within the Arctic Circle in the Barents Sea," van Sebille says, "although we don't expect that to appear for another 50 years."

The buoys also helped the researchers determine that garbage patches are surprisingly cosmopolitan, containing plastic not just from nearby coastlines, but from around the world. "This means that garbage from any country can end up in any one of these garbage patches," van Sebille says. "This tells us that no single country is responsible. Ocean garbage is an international problem that requires an international solution."

But if cutting off their plastic supply won't stop the patches' growth for at least 1,000 years, what kind of international solution is possible? Van Sebille admits the task is daunting, and says any cleanup efforts would be futile. Instead, he suggests focusing on ways to improve the garbage patches' diet. "There's really no solution for getting the plastic out of the ocean. It's too small, too diverse, too thin to get out there with a ship and pick it up," he says. "Of course, the way to go then would be to make plastics that do break down, plastics that even if they get into the ocean, don't really have the time to accumulate in these garbage patches, because they will just disintegrate."

As big and fast-growing as garbage patches are, however, they're still just one symptom of a broader problem. For the next stage of his research, van Sebille plans to study the dynamics of plastic waste closer to coastlines. "Clearly, by the amount of plastic found on beaches, not all of it ends up in the gyres to form garbage patches in the deep ocean," he says. "We need to find out what happens to the plastics closer to land, where most fishing occurs, and what effect that has on the environment around our coasts."

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Sea Turtles Eating Plastic Bags at Alarming Rate

Rare sea turtles eating plastic at record rate
Not only are the endangered animals devouring more plastic than ever before, a new study finds, but the problem is most pronounced among younger turtles.
Mon, Aug 19 2013 at 3:59 PM Related Topics:Marine Life, Oceans, Plastics, Pollution, Wild Animals

Photo: Yamamoto Biology/Creative Commons

Sea turtles around the world are eating plastic at an unprecedented pace, a new study reveals, with some species downing twice as much as they did 25 years ago. This indigestible, potentially fatal diet is especially popular among young turtles in the open ocean, deepening concerns about the ancient animals' long-term outlook.

Plastic bags can bear a striking resemblance to jellyfish underwater, and scientists have long known they have a tendency to confuse hungry sea turtles. But the problem has exploded lately amid a historic surge in plastic pollution, which is forming giant oceanic "garbage patches" that are expected to continue growing for centuries. The new study is the first global analysis of the issue since 1985, covering more than a quarter century of research on green and leatherback sea turtles, both of which are endangered.

While younger turtles eat more gut-clogging plastic than their elders — a troubling trend for animals with such slow reproduction rates — the researchers say the phenomenon is more complex than it appears. Turtles stranded in cluttered coastal areas, for example, don't seem to eat as much plastic as turtles living farther away from people.

"Our research revealed that young, ocean-going turtles were more likely to eat plastic than their older, coastal-dwelling relatives," lead author Qamar Schuyler says in a press release about the research, which was published this month in the journal Conservation Biology. "Amazingly, turtles found adjacent to the heavily populated New York City area showed little or no evidence of debris ingestion, while all of the turtles found near an undeveloped area of southern Brazil had eaten debris."

That shouldn't be taken as carte blanche to litter coastlines, though. About 80 percent of all marine debris comes from land, so cleaning up Coney Island or Copacabana Beach could benefit sea turtles near and far. Instead, Schuyler says, the findings point to the need for a more holistic approach to protecting turtles and other sea life from plastic.

"This means conducting coastal cleanups is not the single answer to the problem of debris ingestion for local sea turtle populations, although it is an important step in preventing marine debris input," Schuyler says. "[The data] indicate oceanic leatherback turtles and green turtles are at the greatest risk of being killed or harmed from ingested marine debris. To reduce this risk, manmade debris must be managed at a global level, from the manufacturers through to the consumers — before debris reaches the ocean."

Managing the planet's flood of plastic is a tall order, though. Some 240,000 plastic bags are used globally every 10 seconds, according to the Sierra Club, and fewer than 5 percent are recycled. U.S. municipal waste is now 13 percent plastic, up from 1 percent 50 years ago, and the average American now uses 300 to 700 plastic bags per year. Broad statistics are scarce, but plastic bags make up roughly 14 percent of all shoreline litter in California, according to an EPA report, and about a quarter of trash in Los Angeles storm drains.

Still, efforts to rein in plastic pollution have gained momentum in recent years. Biodegradable and reusable alternatives are increasingly popular, as are many other strategies to limit plastic consumption. Several U.S. cities and counties have banned plastic bags, including Los Angeles, and Hawaii is planning a statewide ban in 2015. (See this interactive map for a look at bans around the world.) And since a recent study showed sea turtles actually use sanctuaries created for them, protecting more habitat might help offset pressure from other manmade dangers like egg poaching and light pollution.

Monday, August 19, 2013

We Turn Your Trash into Electricity

After waste is deposited into the landfill, it begins to decompose. One of the byproducts of waste decomposition is the production of landfill gas. The predominant substance in landfill gas is methane. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and contributes to global warming, so CEP is required to destroy this gas rather than release it to the atmosphere.

In 2007, CEP began selling landfill gas to INGENCO, a producer of electricity from landfill gas. INGENCO operates a 4 megawatt power plant, using landfill gas as the primary fuel. This generation operates 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, except for scheduled maintenance.At present, the facility is capable of meeting the electricity needs of approximately 2,500 homes. As CEP closes more landfill cells, more landfill gas will become available. INGENCO has designed their facility for future expansion, based on the amount of landfill gas available.

Sunday, August 18, 2013

Local Information

Information on Solid Waste and Recycling
in your county can be found by calling
the following phone numbers:

Craven County:  252-636-6659
Carteret County:  252-728-8595
Pamlico County:  252-745-4240

Saturday, August 17, 2013

North Carolina State Parks and Recreation

We're challenging you to visit every state park in the next year. Are you up to it? If so, you could win some prizes from the makers of our free mobile app -- outdoor gear and gift cards from outdoor retailers. All the details here in our blog: http://ncstateparks.wordpress.com/

Friday, August 16, 2013

Programs Available for Civic, Professional or School Groups

Does your civic or professional group need a speaker? The Coastal Environmental Partnership can arrange an informative program on the management of solid waste for school or civic groups. We will also offer tours of the landfill. Learn what happens to trash after it leaves your home and what you can do to help protect the environment. Call Bobbi Waters, at 252-633-1564 or email her at bobbi@crswma.com

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Electronics Recyling in Craven, Carteret and Pamlico Counties

Electronics(TV's and Computers) are accepted for recycling in Craven, Carteret and Pamlico Counties year round.

To find the drop-off location and schedule for your county, please call:

Craven County: 252-636-6659
Carteret County: 252-728-8595
Pamlico County: 252-745-4240

These items are banned from the Tuscarora Landfill and all other landfills in North Carolina.

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Free Pesticide Collection today, August 14, 2013

North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Carteret County Center 303 College Circle, CMAST Building Morehead City, NC 28557
(252) 222-6352 Phone
(252) 222-6361 Fax

Free Pesticide Collection Day August 14, 2013

Do you have pesticides at your home of farm that you no longer need or use? If your answer is 'yes', then you'll be interested in the Carteret County Pesticide Collection Day on Wednesday, August 14.

The Carteret County Extension Office, in cooperation with the NC Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services' Pesticide Disposal Assistance Program, a NON¬Regulatory and Cost-Free program, will be offering this Pesticide Collection Day for residents in Carteret County and all of the surrounding North Carolina counties. County Agricultural Extension Director Anne Edwards will be the local contact for the event. The Collection will be from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Curb Market, on the corner of 13th and Evans Streets in Morehead City.

Nearly all pesticide products will be accepted at this amnesty collection event, including banned and outdated pesticides. For pesticides with unreadable or missing labels, please contact the Cooperative Extension Office for instructions. Please save any portion of the label to help identify the material so you can be assisted with disposal. Unknown• materials cannot be accepted.

For pressurized pesticide gas cylinders or containers greater than 5 gal in size, please contact the Extension Office BEFORE the Collection Day for special instructions and information. For tips on transporting the pesticides safely to the Collection event, contact the Extension Office.

Each year the Pesticide Disposal Assistance Program (www.ncagr.com/PDAP) visits between 40-50 counties to collect unwanted and unused pesticides through this NON ¬regulatory amnesty Program. This means that a Collection Day of this kind only happens about once every other year in each county!

Don't miss this pesticide collection opportunity in Carteret County co-sponsored by NCDA&CS and the NCCES. For more information go to the County Extension website at http://carteret.ces.ncsu.edu, or contact the Carteret County Agricultural Extension Office at (252) 222-6352.

With kind regards,
Anne D. Edwards
County Extension Director


North Carolina State University and North Carolina A&T State University commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, veteran status or disability. In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation. North Carolina State University, North Carolina A&T State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and local governments cooperating.

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Free Pesticide Collection Day August 14, 2013

North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service
Carteret County Center 303 College Circle, CMAST Building Morehead City, NC 28557
(252) 222-6352 Phone
(252) 222-6361 Fax


Free Pesticide Collection Day August 14, 2013


Do you have pesticides at your home of farm that you no longer need or use?
If your answer is 'yes', then you'll be interested in the Carteret County Pesticide
Collection Day on Wednesday, August 14.
The Carteret County Extension Office, in cooperation with the NC Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services' Pesticide Disposal Assistance Program, a NON¬
Regulatory and Cost-Free program, will be offering this Pesticide Collection Day for
residents in Carteret County and all of the surrounding North Carolina counties.
County Agricultural Extension Director Anne Edwards will be the local contact for the
event. The Collection will be from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Curb Market, on the
corner of 13th and Evans Streets in Morehead City.
Nearly all pesticide products will be accepted at this amnesty collection event, including banned and outdated pesticides. For pesticides with unreadable or missing labels, please contact the Cooperative Extension Office for instructions. Please save any portion of the label to help identify the material so you can be assisted with disposal. Unknown• materials cannot be accepted.
For pressurized pesticide gas cylinders or containers greater than 5 gal in size, please contact the Extension Office BEFORE the Collection Day for special instructions and information. For tips on transporting the pesticides safely to the Collection event, contact the Extension Office.
Each year the Pesticide Disposal Assistance Program (www.ncagr.com/PDAP) visits between 40-50 counties to collect unwanted and unused pesticides through this NON ¬regulatory amnesty Program. This means that a Collection Day of this kind only happens about once every other year in each county!
Don't miss this pesticide collection opportunity in Carteret County co-sponsored by NCDA&CS and the NCCES. For more information go to the County Extension website at http://carteret.ces.ncsu.edu, or contact the Carteret County Agricultural Extension Office at (252) 222-6352.


With kind regards,
Anne D. Edwards
County Extension Director


North Carolina State University and North Carolina A&T State University commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, veteran status or disability. In addition, the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation. North Carolina State University, North Carolina A&T State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and local governments cooperating.

Household Hazardous Waste Recycling Events

Our Household Hazardous Waste Collections Events have been set. Carteret County's Event will be Saturday, September 21, from 8-1 at the Carteret County Health Department.

Craven's Event will be Saturday, October 12 from 8-1 at Craven Community College. Pamlico's Event will be the same day, October 12, from 9-12.

Please call 252-633-1564 if you need more information. Ask for Bobbi Waters.

Monday, August 5, 2013

A Source For a Different Cover


Every afternoon at the Tuscarora Landfill all of the garbage disposed of for the day is covered with 6 inches of dirt. This practice helps prevent litter and odor leaving the landfill site and reduces the number of intruding vermin.

We recently implemented a new method of cover—Posi-Shell®. Posi-Shell® is a spray-applied mineral mortar coating, similar to stucco, that can be used for landfill daily cover, intermediate cover, erosion prevention, and odor control. Imagine pouring chocolate syrup on ice cream and then the chocolate hardens like a shell. You’ve got the idea.


Spraying the liquid material on the garbage

Spraying the liquid material on the garbage




Home Electronics Disposal

There was an error in this gadget